Raingardens/Bioretention Cells

Bioretention areas are shallow, landscaped areas engineered to promote infiltration, evapotranspiration and slow rainfall runoff. There are six components of bioretention systems: grass buffer strips to reduce runoff velocity, ponding area to provide surface storage prior to infiltration, organic mulch layer to protect the soil bed from erosion, planting soil bed to provide water and nutrient to plant life, sand bed to promote infiltration, and plants which remove water through evapotranspiration and they remove pollutants and nutrients through natural processes. Rain gardens accomplish similar goals, however they are composed of natural topographic features, slowing water down further and promoting evapotranspiration at a greater rate. Bio-retention systems treat run-off through sedimentation, filtration, and biological breakdown of biogenic pollutants. These can be sized to treat small or large storm events, and are landscaped with a variety of native water-tolerant plant species. Limitations of bioretention/Raingardens are that they need to be in areas with slopes less than 20% to be effective, pre-treatment is necessary to prevent clogging, insects may become problematic, and because these treatment techniques depend on infiltration, the water table should be greater than 6feet below the surface.

Research Results, % removed
Research Results, % removed

Raingardens provide detention, biodegradation of pollutants, and infiltration
Raingardens provide detention, biodegradation of pollutants, and infiltration
UF EPA Rainworks Challenge artful and educational raingarden proposal
UF EPA Rainworks Challenge artful and educational raingarden proposal
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